Australia – SA – Monsignor David Cappo – Voice of conscience won’t be silenced

Up on Ration Shed – Egroup and BLOG – with thanks to Mark Bourn of the Richard Hillman Foundation

For the original article GO – http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,,26093633-5006301,00.html

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Onward – Jim

“““““““““

THE  RICHARD HILLMAN FOUNDATION ASKS:

 

Why is the elephant in the corner continually hidden by the cardboard cut-outs ?

 

When will the elephant be addressed ? : ” Single Parent Homes”, as this is where the majority of dysfunction originates.

 

….. ‘ Sadly, today, he sees the same cycle going into another generation, wondering whether there are better ways.’ ……

 

But, the cardboard cut-outs cry ‘ HOORAH ‘ as the industries and employment which support the dysfunctional fallout from single parent homes grow ……

 

ANOTHER CUT-OUT: a new approach …. ‘ a different relationship with the community !! ‘ ; .. ( look at the employment opportunities in this one )

 

……. ‘ networks involving schools, community groups and businesses in intervention and diversion, giving people hope, addressing dysfunction in areas including juvenile justice, custodial rehabilitation, Aboriginal affairs and child protection. ‘ ……

 

…………………… nothing about separating families ….so. nothing about stopping the rot ……….. all about the symptoms ….

 

‘ LIVING A LIE ‘  continues, because:

the real cause is ignored, and

basing the ‘ Human Misery’ industries on flawed statistics.

 

…………….  read and draw your own conclusions  ………….

 

http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,,26093633-5006301,00.html

 

David Cappo: Voice of conscience won’t be silenced

ANDREW HOLMAN

September 19, 2009 12:01am 

THE LABOR purists cringe with disdain. Here, a man of the cloth, his white clerical collar a dead give-away, on a hotline to the Premier as the voice of social conscience.

The snipers say he has too much influence, more than some of the Premier’s Cabinet ministers themselves. Indeed Mike Rann, while writing for www.thepunch.com.au ordained him “as one of the most powerful South Australians”.

It’s enough to ruffle the feathers of a tired bureaucracy, a looming modern-day clash of church versus state, a man whom public servants bemoan has too much influence, too much say, and too much of the Premier’s ear.

Maybe he could even become the Premier’s Achilles heel. Some have described the State’s Social Inclusion Commissioner, Monsignor David Cappo, as “the monster Rann created” continually challenging and defying convention and shaking Adelaide out of its “myopic” thinking.

He’s even riling the Opposition.

But Monsignor Cappo won’t be silenced. Maybe, it’s because he was from a large family, one of 11 children. Maybe it’s because of what he has seen.

GO – THE CENTACARE VIEW

GO – THE ANGLICARE VIEW

GO – THE UNITINGCARE WESLEY VIEW

He is dismayed at the breaches of human rights at the Magill Youth Training Centre, putting him on a collision course with a Government involved in an appalling coverup of the conditions.

He is alarmed at the plight of Aborigines. He abhors racism and is alarmed at its cancerous growth once more through society. He has challenged the greedy banks, called on mining companies to provide jobs for the needy. He’s met members of the notorious Gang of 49 and has been an agent of change in areas of mental health.

But there’s so much more on the agenda, so much more in the gospel of social reform for the man whose family came to Adelaide from southern Italy early last century.

In the corridors of the public service, he’s referred to at times as “that priest”.

It’s more suspicion than anything. Because they are aware Monsignor Cappo knows the system – too well. He once was a part of it, a social worker in the Elizabeth region in the 1970s, his own heart tugged and torn by the sights and cries for help.

Some years ago, he spoke about how he was still haunted by terror on people’s faces as babies were taken from their mother’s arms, ranting, drunken fathers and domestic violence. Sadly, today, he sees the same cycle going into another generation, wondering whether there are better ways.

“We don’t have enough people in the system who keep confronting it and say it’s not working,” he said.

Now he dares raise the thought that government agencies may not be the best organisations to deal with some of the issues. “The community more and more distrusts institutions . . . governments, churches, media,” he said.

“Therefore, governments in the future will be about a different relationship with the community, a more engaged relationship and engagement. People on the ground know far better the answers than in a bureaucracy.

“The community and the community sector is an under-utilised resource. These organisations have powerful credibility. They are trusted, and trust is the key to engagement.

“There needs to be a public debate about the role of community agencies and what services they can take on for the community on behalf of government.

“That doesn’t mean government gives up responsibility because governments have to own the responsibility for certain things.

“But I would like to see a debate about that.”

He suggests future welfare formulas could involve not only community agencies, but networks involving schools, community groups and businesses in intervention and diversion, giving people hope, addressing dysfunction in areas including juvenile justice, custodial rehabilitation, Aboriginal affairs and child protection.

“What we find is the more the community takes ownership of an issue, the more you are going to get results.

“Maybe we need to change the whole way the courts work so we have the courts working in unison with the community agencies who are managing the programs.

“We have to be brave enough to explore these ideas. So the public debate has to happen.

“We have to break the cycle.”

Monsignor Cappo said the state’s size should benefit social welfare issues. “It’s not a huge jurisdiction.

“Bureaucracy should nearly know all these people by name, know their issues and we should almost have a personal level of engagement.” Monsignor Cappo warned that the nation’s child protection system needs massive reform.

“The model we have is like a punitive risk-management model, so any complaint goes into the system. The system can’t cope so it only can deal with the extreme end and often gets that wrong.

“It’s got to shift right across to a health and wellbeing model where we help and support families. Yes, there is a hard end that has to be mandatory notification, but not for all of it.

“You need a huge diversionary approach where a lot of these cases go to the community sector in some way, in some form of management and support. That would change the whole system.

“While the Government will pay money to the community sector, in the end it will cost less because you wouldn’t have as many kids in the system or in institutions.”
 

 

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